Monday, February 22, 2016

Plan of Action for Larger Branch Trim


Here is my plan of action for removing the larger trunk/branch of the cherry tree.  It involves three ropes.  The topmost rope will slip knot around one fork of the right branch, go above a small branch and behind the larger branch of the left forked trunk, to use as a fulcrum to keep the top upright once cut.

The second rope will go around both left and right trunks, with slip knot on the outside of the left trunk.  This will be a loose noose to hold the trunk upright but also allow the cut trunk to slide downward, within the confines of the loop, which can be lengthened because of the slip knot.

The bottom trunk control is quite important to this plan.  I will drill two holes, one in the lower outside of the main trunk and one in the outside of the right trunk.  I'll screw large eye hooks into these two places.  The rope will pass through the eye hook on the right upper trunk, go around behind the main trunk and through its eye hook.  A slip knot will allow for tightening.  Hopefully will allow the right branch, once cut, to be guided straight down beside the main trunk.  Temporarily, a rope may run directly around the base of the right branch being cut, just above the cut, to secure it as it begins to loosen.

I've already revised in my mind the placement of the eye hooks and rope for control of the bottom of the branch.  But that's what plans are for.

That's the plan.  Right now at least.

12 comments :

  1. Taking down trees or large limbs makes me nervous. My husband's family takes down trees all the time in their yards. They are a bunch of physicists and study everything very carefully before they begin. It still makes me nervous, but they haven't had any problems so far. I hope you don't either.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Even small limbs can be deadly. It is extremely important to study them carefully first to figure out a safe plan.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It sure looks like you have a plan... but please remember... they don't call them widow-makers for nothing....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They can be unpredictable and even the small branches can kill you.

      Delete
  4. Take care. A limb which breaks in a spot other than where you expect it to (rot or hidden damage) can be lethal.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll probably leave it. I don't have a chainsaw. The sawzall will do two branch cuts, of about 3 inches diameter before the battery needs recharged. Battery has been recharged too often and is too old. Which means I have to handsaw most everything into pieces then. Which is work, with a dollar store handsaw that isn't that sharp anymore. Now that the limb that overhangs the soon to be sold property is gone, probably good enough for me. In reality. Nice to have a plan though, I suppose.

      Delete
  5. You don't have a chainsaw and went to all the trouble to plan this out?????? HONEY! Not having the fastest, sharpest, way of cutting through a limb is begging for a split or a crack which leads to a break........in a BONE.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know people who know people who have friends, with acquaintances who own chain saws!

      Delete
    2. I've cut 8 inch diameter branches with the sawzall and handsaw, branch tied off, so I have time to recharge the battery. I make do.

      Delete
  6. What a relief to "know people who know people". That is how we lived in the country in Indiana. In Florida, there's no people who want to know people, or know their asses from a hole in the ground anyway.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is nice to have connections, have searched for that all my life and I only found it when I started helping out cats and their people. Met so many people of all sorts. I've heard Florida is an on your own kind of place. But it is warm.

      Delete
  7. You are so clever. Be safe!

    ReplyDelete